Overview

Overview

In the eyes of many philosophers, the question of what philosophy is is itself a (difficult) philosophical question. In its most basic sense, it is reflecting on thinking: a critical reflection on the way we understand the world and ourselves. Philosophy is a self-examination of thought that seeks to assure itself of its own roots, tools and limits. In this respect, philosophy always questions people's ability to reason themselves. Subject of the philosophy studies at the Free University of Berlin are the main areas of practical philosophy and theoretical philosophy as well as special areas, e.g. the main epochs of the history of philosophy, the relationship between philosophy and individual sciences, and the relationship between philosophy and the world (Society, culture etc.).

The fundamental problems of philosophy have essentially not changed since its inception. Epistemology asks, for example, questions about the limits and possibilities of our knowledge or about what knowledge of the world is at all. In the field of metaphysics, the most basic categories in which we understand the world are examined: What does it mean that something is? What is space, what is time? What defines a thing's identity through all change? The study area Philosophy of Language and Hermeneutics deals with issues such as the origin and function of linguistic meaning. How is the connection between language and human thinking, recognition, communication and action to be understood? Ethics deals with problems of distinguishing between morally right and wrong attitudes and actions. The study area Political Philosophy, Social Philosophy and Anthropology relates to questions about the fundamentals of human coexistence in society and the state. Aesthetics deals with questions about the nature of the beautiful and about the sources and justifiability of our aesthetic feelings and judgments.

During the course, these questions are analyzed under systematic and historical aspects and from different philosophical perspectives from antiquity to the present. It is about the hermeneutic (understanding) development of texts, their conceptual-analytical clarification and critical reflection. Philosophy students are introduced to the methods of philosophical logic and dialectical reasoning. The bachelor's degree aims to sharpen the ability to argue philosophically and to develop one's own philosophical questions. Philosophy can be studied in close connection with practically all other sciences (humanities, social and natural sciences), since all scientific disciplines pass into philosophical reflections at their margins.

With the 30 CP and 60 CP modules, not the entire subject of the course is dealt with (see course structure).

Program Structure

Philosophy is combined as a core subject with a 60 credit module or two 30 credit modules. Philosophy is combined as a 60 CP module with a 90 CP core subject. Philosophy is combined as a 30 CP module offering with a suitable 120 CP core subject or a 90 CP core subject and a further 30 CP module offering.

In the case of the core subject, at the end of the course there is an exemplary deepening and differentiation of a selected field of study through the independent scientific development of a self-selected problem (Bachelor thesis).

The general vocational preparation study area (ABV) includes an internship as well as the following areas of competence: foreign languages, information and media competence, gender and diversity competence, organizational and management competence, personal and socio-communicative competence as well as additional specialist qualifications in which additional practical professional knowledge and skills mediated. The objectives, content and structure of the general vocational preparation study area are regulated in separate ABV study and examination regulations.

The course regulations regulate the structure and process of the course. It contains detailed descriptions of the content and qualification goals of each individual module and an exemplary course plan. The examination regulations define the type and requirements of the module examinations. In the regulations, the credit points (CP) for each module or event as well as the workload in hours for the entire course are specified.

Philosophy as a 90 CP core subject

Basic phase

Basic module Philosophical reasoning I.
Basic module Philosophical reasoning II
Basic module Introduction to theoretical philosophy and philosophical writing
Basic module Introduction to practical philosophy and the interpretation of major classical works

Build-up phase

Extension module Theoretical Philosophy
Extension module Practical philosophy
Extension module Oral competence in philosophizing
Extension module In-depth focus on philosophizing
Extension module Preparation of the bachelor thesis

Philosophy as a 60 CP module offer

Basic phase

Basic module Philosophical reasoning I.
Basic module Introduction to theoretical philosophy
Basic module Introduction to practical philosophy
Basic module Philosophical reasoning II or own orientation in philosophizing

Build-up phase

Extension module Theoretical Philosophy
Extension module Practical philosophy
Extension module Oral competence in philosophizing
Extension module Written competence in philosophizing

Philosophy as a 30 CP module offer

Basic phase

Basic module Philosophical reasoning I.
Basic module Introduction to theoretical philosophy
Basic module Introduction to practical philosophy
Basic module Philosophical reasoning II or own orientation in philosophizing

Advanced phase (to choose an advanced module)

Extension module Theoretical Philosophy
Extension module Practical philosophy
Extension module Oral competence in philosophizing
Extension module Written competence in philosophizing

Career Prospects

Bachelor graduates have scientific knowledge and practical skills that qualify them for a job or a postgraduate course. If philosophy is studied as a module within the framework of a combined bachelor's degree, the chosen core subject usually shapes the professional qualification.

Graduates of philosophy are not restricted to a specific professional field. The competencies and skills acquired in the course of study qualify them - in combination with corresponding additional qualifications, which can be acquired, for example, in internships - for a variety of activities in which philosophical knowledge and in particular analytical, hermeneutical and logical-argumentative skills are required (e.g. in publishing houses , Media, cultural and educational institutions). With additional business management qualifications, they can work in commercial enterprises, for example in sales and marketing or in human resources.

A master’s degree and, if applicable, a doctorate are prerequisites for management positions or employment in research and teaching.


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